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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Tutorial - Angels Porphyr


The Angels Porphyr use the following GW colors:

Badab Black
Mordian Blue
Enchanted Blue
Skull White
Asurmen Blue
Iyanden Darksun
Charadon Granite
Dheneb Stone
Devlan Mud
Blood Red
Fortress Gray
Bleached Bone
Begin with a white-primed model, then give a thin coat of Badab Black to the entire model.



A layer of Mordian Blue was applied to the left half of the model (or the right half from the model's perspective) - you may need to apply multiple coats of Mordian Blue to get a nice smooth coat.

A layer of Enchanted Blue was applied, leaving some of the Mordian Blue visible in the recesses.  If Enchanted Blue is hard to find in your area, you can use Magic Blue from Vallejo's Game Color line.

Enchanted Blue was mixed 50/50 with Skull White and used to give an edge highlight to the model using a fine detail brush.

All of the blue areas on the model were given a wash of Asurmen Blue to deepen the blues and tie them all together.  Your blue is now finished.

Iyanden Darksun was applied to the chest eagle.  Charadon Granite was applied to the joints, cables, and vents.  Blood Red was applied to the eyes and purity seal.  Dheneb Stone was applied to the parchments.

Devlan Mud was washed over the parchments.  Iyanden Darksun was mixed 50/50 with Skull White and applied to the edges of the eagles wings and heads.  Fortress Gray was used to edge highlight all of the gray areas.

Bleached Bone was applied to the parchments, leaving the previous colors visible in the recesses.  Badab Black was used to wash the gray areas, tying the colors together.

Skull White was used to edge highlight the white areas of the armor.

I went back at this point and smoothed out a lot of the white areas with Fortress Gray, to get rid of the harsh difference between the white and the previous black wash.  Skull White was then reapplied to the edges of the armor.  Now you are finished.  Just finish the base, and add a bolter and get him on the table!

4 comments:

  1. I'm pretty new to modeling, so this is interesting to me.

    Your primer coat looks very thin and spotty to me. Is this intentional?

    Do you draw a line to divide the model, or is this just the result of a lot of practice?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I used a very cheap can of Wal-Mart brand primer that cost $1. Unfortunately, you get what you pay for. Krylon has a very nice line of Indoor/Outdoor paint that has great gray and white primers that I am starting to use. These cost about $5 per can.

    As for black primer, I like Rustoleum black rust-covering paint or Board to Pieces black primers.

    I find it very difficult to resist the $1 price tag of the Wal-Mart brand paints, however. I can't tell much of a difference in the final results of the black primers. The Krylon white and gray Indoor/Outdoor primers are much better, and I would recommend spending a little more on these.

    Also, the straight line is just the result of practice. If you plan on painting an entire army of halved Space Marines, you'll find that it doesn't take long to get pretty good at it. I've started my fourth model for Project Space Marine, and I've gotten to where I don't really need to touch up where the colors meet more than once or twice.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the reply. I threw away a bottle of the WalMart cheap stuff because it came out almost like spray foam- it was terrible. I just wasn't sure if "very little primer" was something that was better in some way.

    I use Board to Pieces a lot, along with a Krylon. I also found an outdoor paint at Sherwin Williams that was not too expensive.

    I'm an admitted 40K newbie- so much so that I don't own anything. I just look.

    What made you do the Chapter project? I really like the idea.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The idea came from my inability to stick with any one project to completion. I have a knack for starting a new army, building and painting a model or two, and then moving on to another project.

    This project makes the best use of my gamer ADD: every model is a new project. It takes almost no time at all to do a single Marine, even to a good standard. I made a list of the Chapters I could find, and started with the ones that are primarily white.

    The beauty of it is that I don't have to stick to any plan. Any Chapter that I feel like painting up, I can :)

    ReplyDelete